Accused of a fallacy? Suspect a fallacy? Ask Dr. Bo and the community!

Quickly register to comment, ask and respond to questions, and get FREE access to our passive online course on cognitive biases!
Register!

one moment please...


Welcome! This is the place to ask the community of experts and other fallacyophites (I made up that word) if someone has a committed a fallacy or not. This is a great way to settle a dispute! This is also the home of the "Mastering Logical Fallacies" student support.


Dr. Bo's Criteria for Logical Fallacies:

  1. It must be an error in reasoning not a factual error.
  2. It must be commonly applied to an argument either in the form of the argument or in the interpretation of the argument.
  3. It must be deceptive in that it often fools the average adult.

Therefore, we will define a logical fallacy as a concept within argumentation that commonly leads to an error in reasoning due to the deceptive nature of its presentation. Logical fallacies can comprise fallacious arguments that contain one or more non-factual errors in their form or deceptive arguments that often lead to fallacious reasoning in their evaluation.

Contact Form



Send me a copy of this message
Send Message sending message...

Q&A Home Question

0

votes

image loading...
bio filo

Eager Newbie

image loading...

bio filo


Eager Newbie

About bio filo

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Fri, Nov 09, 2018 - 02:31 AM

logic just made up stuff like religions.

logic just seems to be a game, of made up rules, made by people , some believe in it, some dont, like any other myth, religions, they might be useful as a tool of control and or power for a few things but mostly useless.



Quick Comment On This Question (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the question owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

3 Answers

1

votes

image loading...
Bo Bennett, PhD
Author of Logically Fallacious

Moderator

image loading...

Bo Bennett, PhD

Author of Logically Fallacious

Moderator

About Bo Bennett, PhD

Bo's personal motto is "Expose an irrational belief, keep a person rational for a day. Expose irrational thinking, keep a person rational for a lifetime."  Much of his charitable work is in the area of education—not teaching people what to think, but how to think.  His projects include his book, The Concept: A Critical and Honest Look at God and Religion, and Logically Fallacious, the most comprehensive collection of logical fallacies.  Bo's personal blog is called Relationship With Reason, where he writes about several topics related to critical thinking.  His secular (humanistic) philosophy is detailed at PositiveHumanism.com.
Bo is currently the producer and host of The Humanist Hour, the official broadcast of the American Humanist Association, where he can be heard weekly discussing a variety of humanistic issued, mostly related to science, psychology, philosophy, and critical thinking.

Full bio can be found at http://www.bobennett.com
Print Fri, Nov 09, 2018 - 07:49 AM
I'll give this post the most charitable interpretation, that is, I am assuming that you are asking this because you have heard other people make similar comments and not that you are troll who likes to enjoys getting emotional reactions out of people by writing ridiculous things :)

Logic does have "rules" but they are not made up by people. These are like the laws the nature that are descriptive, i.e., they are rules/laws that come from observation and testing. The rules are logic are no more "made up by people" then the law of gravity.

As for "some believe in it and some don't," well, some people don't believe in gravity either. Some people are morons.

...like any other myth, religions, they might be useful as a tool of control and or power for a few things but mostly useless.

Sounds like you are referring to rhetoric here, not logic, although mastering logical fallacies can be used for manipulation. The laws of logic and good reasoning are far from useless. In most practical and material terms, logic and reason are the defenses against scams, con artists, and those who use rhetoric to manipulate. As a personal anecdote, professionally I am programmer and software developer who has made millions of dollars mastering logic (programming is all about logic). So useless? I beg to differ :)

Update: Saturday, Nov 10, 2018 12:12 PM

My response to an anonymous comment:

People observe many things and are incorrect all the time.

We are getting setup for a the classic "because people are wrong about some things, then they are probably wrong about this" fallacy. This is fallacious because it is ignoring probability and statistics. For example, because "people are wrong all the time" I cannot logically conclude that I am wrong about having a penis. Each instance of being wrong needs to be evaluated on its own merits.

Language is just made up by people , and logic , math , laws are all made up of language.

Classic equivocation fallacy. Language is "made up" by people as in "socially constructed, created". Logic, math, and laws are "made up" as in "described by". Unlike language, logic, math, natural laws exist whether we describe them by language or not. This is the heart of the problem what I mentioned previously about not understanding the difference between something that is prescriptive versus descriptive.

People have observed and been wrong about most things and will continue to do so.

Demonstrably false. People are right about most things... this is how we navigate the world and survive. We are wrong about many things, and those things are memorable and make a lasting impression, therefore, you come to the wrong conclusion that "People have observed and been wrong about most things" (availability heuristic, confirmation bias).

Thanks for responding , I would think a logical person would be less boastful,

"Boasting" has nothing to do with logic. I provided a concrete example counter to the point that "logic is useless." The example was not for my benefit, it was for the original posters. I guess I could have referenced programmers such as Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg. In fact, those are much better examples.

less likely to use name calling ,

I rarely use name calling, so you are right (at least about me) being less likely to use name calling. I save the rare cases to for instances like these to describe flat earther's and those who share their egregiously incorrect beliefs.

and have a bias for made imaginary things like most.

I have no idea what that means.
Bo Bennett, PhD
Social Scientist, Business Consultant
Coaching / Consulting > https://tinyurl.com/coachingbybo
About My Businesses > http://www.archieboy.com
About Me > http://www.bobennett.com
Books I’ve Written > https://tinyurl.com/bosbooks
Courses I Teach > https://tinyurl.com/boscourses
Podcasts I Host > https://tinyurl.com/bospodcasts


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
Abdulazeez Alabbasi

Seasoned Vet

image loading...

Abdulazeez Alabbasi


Seasoned Vet

About Abdulazeez Alabbasi

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Tue, Nov 13, 2018 - 02:58 AM
That was one hell of a weak analogy. It is fallacious in so many ways.
Rules of religion are "made up" arbitrarily without the intention of acheiving an understanding of the world. Religious rules are things like men should not wear silk, women should not show their hair, and people should not eat pork. The laws of logic are entirely different and are used to acheive a better understanding of the real world and can have their utility be put to the test by seeing differences in the world as a result of applying the rules of logic in many ways.
The fact that some people believe in something while others don't does not make that "something" equally probabilistically true or false to any other thing. Some people don't believe that the Earth is a sphere. Does that make the spherical Earth equally probable with every other proposed geometrical shape like the Earth being flat, cylindrical, cubic, or donut-shaped?


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

0

votes

image loading...
Jim Tarsi

Seasoned Vet

image loading...

Jim Tarsi


Seasoned Vet

About Jim Tarsi

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Wed, Nov 14, 2018 - 08:51 AM
Logic is explained through mathematical rules, which are not man-made, but man-discovered. A simple example:

1) if A is true, then B is true.
2) If B is true, then C is true.
3) Therefore, if A is true, then C is true.

That relationship was put into words by man, not made up by him. It doesn't matter whether you believe it or not; it is true nonetheless.

I have heard a discussion that religion is man's way of trying to explain death. As such, it is an extension of logic, with a lot of information yet to be discovered to verify or refute people's statements. If you think this is a useless endeavor, so be it; that's your prerogative. I don't think it's useless; in fact, I use many religious discussions to guide the way I live.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

Registered User Comments



About Archieboy Holdings, LLC. Privacy Policy Other Books Written by Bo
 Website Software Copyright 2018, Archieboy Holdings, LLC.