Accused of a fallacy? Suspect a fallacy? Ask Dr. Bo and the community!

Quickly register to comment, ask and respond to questions, and get FREE access to our passive online course on cognitive biases!
Register!

one moment please...


Welcome! This is the place to ask the community of experts and other fallacyophites (I made up that word) if someone has a committed a fallacy or not. This is a great way to settle a dispute! This is also the home of the "Mastering Logical Fallacies" student support.


Dr. Bo's Criteria for Logical Fallacies:

  1. It must be an error in reasoning not a factual error.
  2. It must be commonly applied to an argument either in the form of the argument or in the interpretation of the argument.
  3. It must be deceptive in that it often fools the average adult.

Therefore, we will define a logical fallacy as a concept within argumentation that commonly leads to an error in reasoning due to the deceptive nature of its presentation. Logical fallacies can comprise fallacious arguments that contain one or more non-factual errors in their form or deceptive arguments that often lead to fallacious reasoning in their evaluation.

Contact Form



Send me a copy of this message
Send Message sending message...

Q&A Home Question

0

votes

image loading...
Rebecca Jerstice

Eager Newbie

image loading...

Rebecca Jerstice


Eager Newbie

About Rebecca Jerstice

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Fri, Oct 19, 2018 - 04:03 PM

Is this a red herring or something else? Use of two word phrase to comment on a much larger argument eg discussion on mental health answer ‘modern Britain’

Something I’ve seen a lot recently is to reply to a wide ranging debate with a one word or short phrase such as ; teen depression rates triple’ reply ‘modern britian’ this sort of behaviour stifles debate and in some way implies that the commentator is correct... what type of fallacy is this?



Quick Comment On This Question (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the question owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

2 Answers

0

votes

image loading...
Michael Chase Walker
Screenwriter, producer, mythoclast

Seasoned Vet

image loading...

Michael Chase Walker

Screenwriter, producer, mythoclast

Seasoned Vet

About Michael Chase Walker

Michael Chase Walker is an actor, author, screenwriter, producer, and a former adjunct lecturer for the College of Santa Fe Moving Images Department, and Dreamworks Animation. His first motion picture was the animated classic, The Last Unicorn.
Michael was an in-house television writer for the hit television series: He-Man, She-Ra, Voltron, and V, the Series. In 1985, he was appointed Director of Children's programs for CBS Entertainment where he conceived, shaped and supervised the entire 1985 Saturday Morning line-up: Wildfire, Pee Wee's Playhouse, Galaxy High School, Teen Wolf, and over 10
Print Fri, Oct 19, 2018 - 04:45 PM
Hi Rebecca,

Offhand the case might be made for Argument by Gibberish (see Dr. Bo's lists)
(also known as: bafflement, argument by jargon) but the way the question is framed
it's difficult to even determine if there is a fallacy at all. You might try rewording it and asking again.

Best

0

votes

image loading...
David Franks

Eager Newbie

image loading...

David Franks


Eager Newbie

About David Franks

Sorry, this user has not created a bio yet.
Print Sun, Oct 21, 2018 - 02:53 AM
Person B didn't offer enough of a response to demonstrate a flaw in reasoning and so the response shouldn't be considered a fallacy. The two words don't even constitute a sentence; they are an adjective and a proper noun. Instead of rebutting Person A's statement with a counterstatement (which might have contained a fallacy), Person B appears to have offered an example of the situation described by Person A. As such, it may or may not be accurate, but if it is inaccurate, then it is incorrect, not fallacious.


Quick Comment On This Answer (no login required):
Your comment below will be anonymously sent to the answer owner, it will not be posted, and you will not get a response.

Send Comment sending comment...

Registered User Comments

Rebecca Jerstice
Saturday, October 20, 2018 - 03:02:56 AM
@Michael Chase Walker: Ok, I wasn’t stating that it is concrete example of a fallacy- as I was asking whether it was one or not.... so, I will try again.

Person A: teen depression rates have peaked and it has been said that this is, in part, due to parental pressures and feelings attributed to perceived failures in the realms of appearance and soocial standing.
Person B: modern Britain

Also, wow you lot are pretty harsh!!

login to reply
5 replies
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...
 

Michael Chase Walker
Saturday, October 20, 2018 - 01:30:29 PM
Haha, sorry about that. It certainly wasn't intended. I don't detect a flaw in reasoning in either A or B. A is certainly making a reasonable claim of fact and statistics whereas B is simply commenting or opinionating (perhaps, flippantly) that modern social norms in 'modern Britain' are perpetuating teen depression through its rigid, age-old demands on class and fashion. Of course, the argument could be made that B is guilty of a Part-to-Whole reasoning by blaming all of Britain and modernity for soaring teen depression rates, but even that would be a stretch as B's claim, however terse, is more of a quip (hasty generalization?) than flawed logic. At least, that's my take.

login to reply
 
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...
 

skips777
Sunday, October 21, 2018 - 02:20:01 AM
Is person A talking about Britain's teen depression rates? If so, person B is simply reiterating that that is the current state of Britains' "teen" society. If person A is discussing another country then person B is just suggesting a parallel. There's nothing fallacious about drawing a parallel if two countries have the same issue.
Person A might be using a cause and effect fallacy. failures of appearance and/or social standing doesn't necessarily cause teen depression. There can be numerous factors as Dr.Bo, being a psychologist, will likely point out.

login to reply
 
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...
 

Rebecca Jerstice
Sunday, October 21, 2018 - 05:23:57 AM
@Michael Chase Walker: thank you so much 😊 it’s alwaus annoyed me, and I put it down to flippancy, just wondered if there was something else I was missing out on! Have a good weekend!

login to reply
 
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...
 

Michael Chase Walker
Sunday, October 21, 2018 - 12:41:13 PM
@Rebecca Jerstice: Thank you, you too. There are kernels of notions (Hasty Generalization, Cause and Effect, Whole-to-Part, Appeal to Jargon) that might as yet turn in to some sort of flawed logic as some of us have pointed out, but nothing specific enough so far. However to your earlier point about "Modern Britain" being a more and more frequent response to complex issues sounds more like a convenient political meme than a logical fallacy per se.

login to reply
 
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...
 

Rebecca Jerstice
Sunday, October 21, 2018 - 06:14:33 PM
@Michael Chase Walker: thank you very much!

login to reply
 
0 votes
 
Reply To Comment
working...



About Archieboy Holdings, LLC. Privacy Policy Other Books Written by Bo
 Website Software Copyright 2018, Archieboy Holdings, LLC.